Employee Privacy: Georgia

This item is part of Employee Privacy.

The below content should be reviewed in conjunction with the in-depth federal coverage of this topic provided above.

Author: C. R. Wright, Fisher & Phillips LLP

Summary

  • Georgia recognizes all four common law claims for invasion of privacy. See Invasion of Privacy.
  • Georgia has laws regulating employee testing for drugs and alcohol, and for AIDS/HIV. See Testing of Employees and Applicants.
  • The Georgia Drug-Free Workplace law requires employers with government contracts totaling $25,000 or more to certify that they maintain a drug-free workplace and offers a discount on workers' compensation insurance premiums to employers who comply with certain provisions including applicant testing for drugs. See Testing of Employees and Applicants.
  • Georgia restricts the use of criminal records for employment purposes under some circumstances. See Criminal History.
  • Georgia law restricts an employer's ability to search employee vehicles for guns and allows certain individuals to carry weapons in public places. See Guns in the Workplace.
  • Georgia law prohibits defamation, but allows employers to provide job reference information in good faith. See References.
  • Georgia has laws addressing computer data and computer offenses. See Computer Data and Computer Offenses.
  • Georgia allows a party to a conversation to record that conversation. See Wiretapping and Recording of Conversations.
  • It is unlawful to engage in video surveillance unless it is for security purposes and in areas where an individual does not have a reasonable expectation of privacy. See Video Surveillance.