HR Support on Religious Discrimination at Work

Editor's Note: Address workplace discrimination based on religion.

Beth P. Zoller Overview: Title VII and various state laws provide individuals with protection from religious discrimination in the workplace. Therefore, an employer is prohibited from treating an applicant or employee unfavorably based on his or her religious beliefs. Generally, employers only need to accommodate the needs of individuals who have sincerely held religious beliefs. An employee cannot be forced to participate or not participate in a religious activity as a condition of employment.

Further, employers should understand that there are exceptions when it comes to religious discrimination. It is generally permissible for employers to give employment preference to members of their own religion. In addition, clergy members performing religious functions generally cannot bring claims under the federal employment discrimination laws such as Title VII, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA), and the Equal Pay Act (EPA).

Trends: A recent survey by the Pew Research Center identifies a significant rise religious intolerance, bias and hate crimes against religious individuals. Therefore, there is a greater need to protect religious individuals in the workplace. Thus, employers need to focus on policies and practices that will prohibit discrimination based on religion. Further, employers should be aware that in 2014, the EEOC issued updated guidance for employers regarding providing employees with religious accommodations when it comes to dress codes, grooming and appearance. The guidance covers clothing as well as hairstyles and facial hair. Additionally, the EEOC has identified targeting recruiting and hiring practices that discriminate against ethnic and religious groups as a priority in its Strategic Enforcement Plan.

Author: Beth P. Zoller, JD, Legal Editor

New and Updated

  • Podcast: EEOC Takes Aim at Tackling National Origin Discrimination

    Date:
    January 24, 2017
    Type:
    Podcasts and Webinars

    EEOC Senior Attorney Advisor Muslima Lewis discusses her agency's recent enforcement guidance on national origin discrimination and what employers need to know.

  • Mandatory Flu Shot Programs Without Religious Exemptions Targeted by EEOC

    Date:
    January 6, 2017
    Type:
    News

    Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 requires employers to reasonably accommodate applicants' and employees' sincerely held religious practices, unless doing so would impose an undue hardship on the operation of their business.

  • EEOC Issues Religious Discrimination Prevention Resource

    Date:
    July 26, 2016
    Type:
    News

    The US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has announced the release of a one-page fact sheet designed to communicate religious discrimination protections to younger workers. In addition, the EEOC will implement changes in the collection of demographic data from individuals who file charges with the agency.

  • Mississippi Religious Freedom Law Blocked, North Carolina Law Tweaked

    Date:
    July 8, 2016
    Type:
    News

    A federal judge has blocked a controversial Mississippi law that would have allowed individuals and some public officials to deny services to members of the LGBT community. US District Judge Carlton Reeves issued a preliminary injunction blocking the law minutes before it was set to take effect. Meanwhile, the Justice Department is challenging a similar North Carolina law.

  • Date:
    June 9, 2016
    Type:
    Legal Timetable

  • Religious Issues in the Workplace - Supervisor Briefing

    Type:
    Supervisor Training

    This briefing for supervisors examines the law and best practices for supervisors when it comes to managing religious issues in the workplace such as avoiding religious discrimination, harassment and retaliation, reasonable accommodation of religious beliefs and practices and types of religious accommodations.

  • Religious Accommodation Handbook Statement

    Type:
    Employee Handbooks

    Employers covered by Title VII and seeking to advise employees of their right to seek accommodations based on religion should consider including this model policy statement in their handbook.

  • Ramadan and the Workplace

    Date:
    June 22, 2015
    Type:
    Editor's Choice

  • Religious Organizations May Be Exempt from Federal Antidiscrimination Laws

    Date:
    October 2, 2012
    Type:
    Law Reports

    In Hosanna-Tabor Evangelical Lutheran Church and School v. EEOC, 132 S. Ct. 694 (2012), the US Supreme Court considered whether the ministerial exception prohibiting employment-related suits against religious organizations barred a discrimination claim by a teacher who performed religious functions at a parochial school.

  • Employer May Not Be Liable For Religious Discrimination if a Requested Accommodation Causes an Undue Burden

    Date:
    September 4, 2012
    Type:
    Law Reports

    In Webb v. City of Philadelphia., the 3rd Circuit addressed whether the City of Philadelphia discriminated when it denied a police officer's request to wear a religious headscarf while on duty.

About This Topic

HR guidance on how to create and implement policies and practices that prohibit discrimination based on religion and make sure that religious employees and applicants are treated fairly.