On-the-Job Training

Editor's Note: Prepare employees with needed competencies through workplace instruction.

Marta MoakleyOverview: Even the most seasoned workers, vigorously recruited and promptly hired by organizations, will need to undergo on-the-job employee training and development. This is particularly true for supervisors and managers, who require a profound knowledge of internal processes and procedures not only to guide subordinates in the fulfillment of organizational goals, but also to minimize any liability arising from a notable departure from regular procedures. Such departures lead to inconsistency and, ultimately, potential unfairness (whether perceived or fact-based) within the organization.

On-the-job training is an indispensable part of an employee's professional development. Therefore, employers should focus on training throughout an employee's life cycle. Specifically, an employer should have an organized plan for a new hire on his or her first day, including scheduled training for internal processes, antiharassment and any required safety training. In addition, on-the-job training should be provided throughout an employee's career, including shadowing a supervisor or other employee in order to acquire new competencies necessary for career growth.

Trends: Employers in a global marketplace must contend with challenges in providing consistent and uniform on-the-job training to new hires and current employees. A number of employers have chosen training software vendors that emphasize a centralized approach for certain internal procedures, while remaining easily customizable based on local tastes and priorities.

Author: Marta Moakley, JD, Legal Editor

Latest items in On-the-Job Training

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    Type:
    Policies and Documents

    An employer may use this checklist to ensure their safety training program is adequate. While safety training necessities will be different for every employer, there are some steps that all employers should consider.

  • ADA: An Overview - Supervisor Briefing

    Type:
    Supervisor Training

    This briefing for supervisors examines the law and best practices for complying with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

  • Training and Development: Maine

    Type:
    Employment Law Manual

    In-depth review of the spectrum of Maine employment law requirements HR must follow with respect to training and development.

  • Training and Development: Tennessee

    Type:
    Employment Law Manual

    In-depth review of the spectrum of Tennessee employment law requirements HR must follow with respect to training and development.

  • How to Conduct a Training Needs Analysis

    Type:
    How To

    This How To details the steps an employer should take when conducting a training needs analysis.

  • Certificate of Training

    Type:
    Policies and Documents

    An employer may use this form to document the completion of a training course by an employee. Whether internal or external training methods are used, training employees affords an employee an opportunity for growth and further develop their job skills.

  • How to Train Workers for Dangerous Jobs

    Type:
    How To

    This How To details the steps an employer should take to train employees for dangerous jobs.

  • Safety Training Policy

    Type:
    Policies and Documents

    An employer may use this policy as a proactive tool to help set a framework for the methods and reasons employee training is provided. Implementing a Safety Training Program teaches employees to recognize and avoid dangerous situations in the workplace while ensuring the employer is in compliance with Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations.

  • Active Learning

    Type:
    Employment Glossary

    Employment glossary definition of Active Learning.

About This Topic

HR guidance on the legal risks and benefits of on-the-job training.