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Employee Handbooks - Work Rules - Employee Conduct: Alaska

Employee Handbooks - Work Rules - Employee Conduct requirements for other states

Federal law and guidance on this subject should be reviewed together with this section.

Author: Gloria Ju

Summary

At-Will Nature of Employment

The Alaska Supreme Court recognizes the employment at-will doctrine. See Long v. Newby, +488 P.2d 719 (Alaska 1971). The employment at-will doctrine means that either an employer or an employee can terminate the employment relationship at any time. However, the court also recognizes a contract-based exception to the employment at-will doctrine where an employee handbook indicates that no terminations will occur without cause. See Rutledge v. Alyeska Pipeline Serv. Co., +727 P.2d 1050 (Alaska 1986).

Employers can use a handbook or policy manual disclaimer to help protect the at-will employment relationship, but it may not be enough to overcome contract language found elsewhere in the handbook or manual. For example, a one-sentence disclaimer, followed by 85 pages of detailed text covering policies, rules, regulations and definitions, does not unambiguously and conspicuously inform employees that the manual is not part of the employee's contract of employment. See Jones v. Central Peninsula General Hospital, +779 P.2d 783 (Alaska 1989).

Work Rules Concerning Political Activity and Employee Expression of Views

The State Personnel Act places restrictions on state employees' political activities, including campaigning on behalf of a political candidate on government time. The law also prohibits state employees from being discriminated against due to political beliefs. +Alaska Stat. § 39.25.160.

State employees have a statutory right to express political opinions. However, while engaged on official business, a state employee may not display or distribute partisan political material. +Alaska Stat. § 39.25.178(3).

State employers may not directly or indirectly restrict or attempt to restrict employees' after-working-hours statements, pronouncements or other activities that are not otherwise prohibited by law or personnel rule, if the employee does not purport to speak or act in an official capacity. +Alaska Stat. § 39.26.010(a)(5).

Work Rules Concerning Employee Codes of Conduct, Ethics and Conflicts of Interest

All public officers within the state's executive branch agencies must abide by the Alaska Executive Branch Ethics Act, which includes rules on the misuse of an employee's official position; accepting gifts; the improper use and disclosure of information; improperly influencing state grants, contracts, leases and loans; and outside employment. +Alaska Stat. § 39.52.010 et seq.

Work Rules Concerning Personal Relationships and Personal Activities

Personal Relationships

Alaska prohibits the spouse or first- or second-degree blood relative of the executive head of a principal state department or agency to be employed in that department or agency. +Alaska Stat. § 39.90.020.

Personal Activities

State employers may not directly or indirectly restrict or attempt to restrict employees' after-working-hours statements, pronouncements or other activities that are not otherwise prohibited by law or personnel rule, if the employee does not purport to speak or act in an official capacity. +Alaska Stat. § 39.26.010(a)(5).

Work Rules Concerning Smoking, Alcohol and Drug Use

Drug Testing

Employers may voluntarily establish a drug and alcohol testing program. +Alaska Stat. §§ 23.10.600 et seq. However, employers may only carry out such testing after adopting a written policy and distributing a copy of the policy to each employee subject to testing or making the policy available to employees in the same manner as the employer informs its employees of other personnel practices (e.g., including in a personnel handbook, posting in a place accessible to employees). The employer must also inform prospective employees that they must undergo drug testing. +Alaska Stat. § 23.10.620(a).

The policy must include, at a minimum:

  1. A statement of the employer's policy on drug and alcohol use by employees;
  2. A description of those employees or prospective employees who are subject to testing;
  3. The circumstances under which testing may be required;
  4. The substances as to which testing may be required;
  5. A description of the testing methods and collection procedures to be used, including an employee's right to a confirmatory drug test to be reviewed by a licensed physician or doctor of osteopathy after an initial positive drug test result;
  6. The consequences of refusing to participate in the testing;
  7. Any adverse personnel action that may be taken based on the testing procedure or results;
  8. The right of an employee to request the written test results and the obligation of the employer to provide written test results to the employee within five working days after a written request to do so, so long as the written request is made within six months after the date of the test;
  9. The right of an employee, on the employee's request, to explain in a confidential setting a positive test result; if the employee makes a written request within 10 working days after the employee is notified of the test result, the employer must provide an opportunity to explain within 72 hours after receiving the request, or before taking an adverse employment action;
  10. A statement of the employer's policy regarding the confidentiality of the test results.

+Alaska Stat. § 23.10.620(b).

Smoking in the Workplace

Effective October 1, 2018, Alaska has a statewide smoking ban that includes smoking tobacco, e-cigarettes, or other oral smoking devices in an enclosed area in a public place. +2017 Bill Text AK S.B. 63.

Smoking means using an e-cigarette or other oral smoking device or inhaling, exhaling, burning, or carrying a lighted or heated cigar, cigarette, pipe, or tobacco or plant product intended for inhalation. E-cigarette is defined as any product containing or delivering nicotine or any other substance intended for human consumption that can be used by a person through inhalation of vapor or aerosol from the product, of any size or shape, whether the product is manufactured, distributed, marketed, or sold as an e-cigarette, e-cigar, e-pipe, e-hookah, vape pen, or any other product name or descriptor.

The law prohibits smoking at the following enclosed spaces:

  • At an entertainment venue or a sports arena;
  • On a bus, in a taxicab, on a ferry, or in another vehicle used for public transportation;
  • At a public transit depot, bus shelter, airport terminal, or other public transportation facility;
  • At a retail store or shopping center;
  • At a place of government or public assembly located on property that is owned or operated by the state, a municipality, or a regional educational attendance area, or by an agent of the state, a municipality, or a regional educational attendance area.
  • In an office building, office, hotel, motel, restaurant, bar, retail store, or shopping center;
  • In a common area in an apartment building or multiple-family dwelling;
  • In a place of employment, including a vehicle;
  • At a public or private educational facility;
  • At a health care facility, including residential units in the health care facility;
  • In a building or residence that is used to provide paid child care, whether or not children are present in the building or residence, or care for adults on a fee-for-service basis. However, an individual may smoke in a private residence that is in a building where another residence provides paid child care or care for adults; and
  • On a vessel operating as a shore-based fisheries business.

An enclosed area means space between a floor and a ceiling that is bounded on two or more sides by a combination of walls, doorways, windows, or other physical barriers that may be open, partially open, closed, retractable, temporary, or permanent. A place of employment means work areas, private offices, hotel and motel rooms, employee lounges, restrooms, conference rooms, classrooms, cafeterias, hallways, vehicles, and other employee work areas that are under the control of an employer.

In addition, smoking is banned outdoors as follows:

  • Within 10 feet of playground equipment located at a public or private school or a state or municipal park while children are present;
  • In a seating area for an outdoor arena, stadium, or amphitheater;
  • At a place of employment or health care facility that has declared the entire campus or outside grounds or property to be smoke-free;
  • Within:
    • 10 feet of an entrance to a bar or restaurant that serves alcoholic beverages;
    • 20 feet of an entrance, open window, or heating or ventilation system air intake vent at an enclosed area at a place where smoking is prohibited; or
    • A reasonable distance, as determined by the owner or operator, of an entrance, open window, or heating or ventilation system air intake vent of:
      • (i) a vessel covered under the law; or
      • (ii) a long term care facility.

The law defines employer as:

  • The state;
  • A municipality;
  • A regional educational attendance area; and
  • A person or a business with one or more employees.

An employer (and/or building manager) may not:

  • Permit an employee, customer or other person to smoke inside an enclosed area at a place of employment;
  • Provide ashtrays or other smoking accessories for use in that building or workplace; or
  • Require an employee, customer or other person to enter a stand-alone shelter for a purpose other than smoking.

Alaska Stat. § 18.35.311.

See Employee Health: Alaska.

The law contains anti-retaliation protections. Specifically, an employer may not terminate or in any other manner retaliate against an employee because the employee cooperates with or initiates enforcement of a requirement under the law. Alaska Stat. § 18.35.326.

The law contains requirements regarding signs to indicate that smoking is prohibited by law.

See Employee Communications: Alaska.

Medical Marijuana

Alaska permits the medical use of marijuana by registered patients with a debilitating medical condition. A debilitating medical condition is defined as:

  • Cancer, glaucoma, positive status for human immunodeficiency virus, or acquired immune deficiency syndrome or treatment for any of these conditions; or
  • Any chronic or debilitating disease or treatment for such diseases, which produces, for a specific patient, one or more of the following, and for which, in the professional opinion of the patient's physician, such condition or conditions reasonably may be alleviated by the medical use of marijuana:
    • Cachexia;
    • Severe pain;
    • Severe nausea;
    • Seizures, including those that are characteristic of epilepsy; or
    • Persistent muscle spasms, including those that are characteristic of multiple sclerosis.

+Alaska Stat. § 17.37.070.

See Disabilities (ADA): Alaska.

Alaska's law expressly does not require an employer to provide accommodation of any medical use of marijuana in the workplace, +Alaska Stat. § 17.37.040. Further, an Alaska employer should be mindful of the federal ADA and Drug-Free Workplace Act.

Individuals who are enrolled in the state's patient registry and who possess a valid identification card may legally possess up to one ounce of usable marijuana. The identification card must include the physician's recommendation and the diagnosis of the condition that requires such use.

An employer need not, however, accept medical marijuana usage as a legitimate excuse for an applicant's positive drug test. And, there is no law precluding employers from denying employment as a result.See Preemployment Screening and Testing: Alaska.

Nonetheless, employers adopting drug and alcohol testing policies should notify applicants of the policy in writing at the time of application and include clear information about the employer's position on medical marijuana in their policy. Alaska employers may want to consult local counsel on this issue.

Recreational Marijuana

In November 2014, Alaska voters passed a ballot measure to legalize the recreational possession and use of small amounts of marijuana. Under the measure, adults 21 and over may possess up to one ounce of marijuana and grow six marijuana plants at home. The Alaska law expressly states that nothing in the ballot initiative is intended to require an employer to permit or accommodate marijuana use in the workplace. As a result, an employer may still maintain a drug-free workplace policy.

Work Rules Regarding Workplace Violence

Employers may not adopt or enforce a policy or rule prohibiting an individual from:

  • Possessing a firearm while that individual is within a motor vehicle; or
  • Storing a firearm that is locked in the individual's motor vehicle while the motor vehicle is otherwise legally parked in or on state or municipal property or another person's property.

However, an employer or its agent may prohibit the possession of firearms within a secured restricted access area in a vehicle owned, leased or rented by the employer or its agent or in a parking lot owned or controlled by the employer within 300 feet of the secured restricted access area that does not include common areas of ingress and egress open to the general public. The employer or its agent must post conspicuous notice of the prohibition against possession of firearms at each entrance to the restricted access area and affected parking area. Restricted access area means the area beyond a secure point where visitors are screened and does not include common areas of ingress and egress open to the general public. +Alaska Stat. § 18.65.800; +Alaska Stat. § 29.35.145(e)(2).

Work Rules Regarding Use of Employer Equipment, Vehicles and Communication Systems

Employer Equipment

In order to ensure that employer-issued equipment is returned clean and in good condition, employers may deduct an amount from employees' wages as a security deposit, as long as:

  • The employee agrees to the deduction in writing;
  • The total deposit does not exceed the cost of the item; and
  • The deduction does not reduce the employee's wage below the statutory minimum or reduce the employee's overtime compensation below one and one-half times the contractual rate of pay.

+8 Alaska Admin. Code 15.160.

Employees cannot be required to purchase equipment if:

  • The equipment is required by federal, state, or local safety or health codes; or
  • The nature of the employer's business requires the use, and if the equipment:
    1. Is distinctive and advertises or is associated with the products or services of the employer, except that the equipment may advertise the employer's products or services if the equipment is customarily sold to the public by the employer; or
    2. Cannot be used during the employee's normal social activities.

+8 Alaska Admin. Code 15.165.

Monitoring/Surveillance

Although not workplace-specific, Alaska law prohibits the intentional interception and divulgence or publication of a private communication without authorization by a party to the communication. +Alaska Stat. § 42.20.300(b). Private communication means an oral, wire or electronic communication uttered or transmitted by a person who has a reasonable expectation that the communication is not subject to interception. +Alaska Stat. § 42.20.390(11).

Alaska also prohibits the use of an eavesdropping device to hear or record an oral conversation without the consent of a party to the conversation. Eavesdropping device means any device capable of being used to hear or record oral conversation whether the conversation is conducted in person, by telephone or by any other means. +Alaska Stat. § 42.20.310.

Prohibited Conduct

Employees who violate policies on theft or property damage can be disciplined as the employer sees fit. However, discipline in the form of a wage deduction is restricted. Deductions may not be made from an employee's wages for:

  • Customer checks returned due to insufficient funds or any other reason;
  • Non-payment for goods or services as a result of theft or credit default;
  • Cash or cash register shortages, unless the employee admits, willingly and in writing, to having personally taken the specific amount of cash that is alleged to be missing;
  • Lost, missing or stolen property, unless the employee admits, willingly and in writing, to having personally taken the specific property alleged to be lost, missing or stolen; or
  • Damage or breakage costs, unless clearly due to willful conduct of the employee and the employee has acknowledged responsibility in writing.

+8 Alaska Admin. Code 15.160.

Work Rules Regarding Off-Duty Conduct

Arrest or Conviction of Crime

Information about an employee's off-duty arrest is off-limits to employers. Criminal justice information, except for nonconviction information or correctional treatment information, may be provided to a person for any purpose. +Alaska Stat. § 12.62.160(b)(8).

Moonlighting and Outside Employment

Public employees are prohibited from moonlighting if it creates a conflict of interest with the employee's official duties. Public employees who work outside the employee's agency must report the outside employment to a designated supervisor by July 1 of each year. Any changes in an employee's outside employment must be reported to the designated supervisor as it occurs. +Alaska Stat. § 39.52.170.

Work Rules Regulating Employee Dress, Grooming and Personal Appearance

Employers in Alaska are relatively free to implement rules regarding dress, grooming and personal appearance, as long as they comply with the Alaska Human Relations Law (AHRL), which prohibits discrimination in employment based on race, religion, color, national origin (including ancestry), age, sex, physical or mental disability, marital status, changes in marital status, pregnancy and parenthood. +Alaska Stat. § 18.80.200.

Uniforms

In order to ensure that employer-issued uniforms are returned clean and in good condition, employers may deduct an amount from employees' wages as a security deposit, as long as:

  • The employee agrees to the deduction in writing;
  • The total deposit does not exceed the cost of the item; and
  • The deduction does not reduce the employee's wage below the statutory minimum or reduce the employee's overtime compensation below one and one-half times the contractual rate of pay.

+8 Alaska Admin. Code 15.160.

Employees cannot be required to purchase a uniform if:

  • The uniform is required by federal, state, or local safety or health codes; or
  • The nature of the employer's business requires the use, and if the uniform:
    1. Is distinctive and advertises or is associated with the products or services of the employer, except that the clothing that constitutes a uniform may advertise the employer's products or services if the uniform is customarily sold to the public by the employer; or
    2. Cannot be worn during the employee's normal social activities.

+8 Alaska Admin. Code 15.165.

Work Rules Regarding Employee Work Schedules and Shifts

When creating work rules and policies regarding employee work schedules and shifts, employers should consider the following issues.

Work Hours and Workweek

The Alaska Wage and Hour Act (AWHA) does not define hours worked, which means Alaska follows the federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) in defining the term. +Alaska Stat. § 23.10.145. However, Alaska specifically limits the number of hours a miner can work in an underground mine to 10 hours in 24 hours, except on a day when a shift change is made. +Alaska Stat. § 23.10.410.

The AWHA gives employers the ability to provide employees with a flexible work schedule without being liable for paying overtime after eight hours in a day under:

  1. A flexible work hour plan included in a collective bargaining agreement; or
  2. A voluntary flexible work hour plan for which the employee and the employer have signed a written agreement that is approved by the Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Overtime is paid after 40 hours a week or 10 hours a day.

+Alaska Stat. § 23.10.060(d)(13)-(14); +8 Alaska Admin. Code 15.102.

The Alaska Supreme Court has held that the overtime exemption for flexible work hour plans included in a collective bargaining agreement is not statutorily limited to 40 hours a week and 10 hours a day as are voluntary flexible work hour plans that are not included in a collective bargaining agreement. See Ganz v. Alaska Airlines, Inc., +963 P.2d 1015 (Alaska 1998).

Regular Work Hours Versus On-Call Hours

When computing an employee's hours for the purpose of determining overtime, employers must include periods of on-call time and standby or waiting time required for the convenience of the employer that were a necessary part of the employee's job. However, if the employee is completely relieved from all duties for 20 minutes or more during which the employee may use the time effectively for the employee's own purposes, then those periods need not be counted. +8 Alaska Admin. Code 15.100.

On-call time means time that an employee is required to remain on call on the employer's premises or other place of employment or so close to them that the time cannot be used effectively for the employee's own purposes. It does not include the time an employee is not required to remain on or near the employer's premises or other place of employment but is merely required to leave word with the employer where the employee may be reached by cellular phone, beeper or other means. Standby or waiting time means time that an employee is required to be at or near the place of employment and is required to wait for work or an assignment, whether or not because of shutdown or repair, and during which the time cannot be used effectively for the employee's own purposes. +8 Alaska Admin. Code 15.910.

Break Times and Meal Times

Alaska employers are not required to provide meal or rest periods for adult employees. Minors under 18 years of age are entitled to a break of at least 30 minutes if they are scheduled to work for six or more consecutive hours. The break may be scheduled at the employer's convenience, but it must occur after the first hour and a half of work and before the beginning of the last hour of work. Minors who work for five consecutive hours without a break are entitled to a break of at least 30 minutes before continuing to work. +Alaska Stat. § 23.10.350.

Regular Payday

Employees must be paid at least monthly, but may elect semimonthly pay periods. +Alaska Stat. § 23.05.140(a). Employers must notify employees in writing at the time of hiring of the day and place of payment, and rate of pay. Any changes to the day or place of payment, or rate of pay, must be provided before the change is made. Notification may be posted in a conspicuous place where it can be seen by each employee as the employee comes or goes to the place of work.

+Alaska Stat. § 23.05.160.

Holidays

Alaska observes the following legal holidays:

  • January 1, known as New Year's Day;
  • The third Monday of January, known as Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Birthday;
  • The third Monday in February, known as Presidents' Day;
  • The last Monday of March, known as Seward's Day;
  • The last Monday in May, known as Memorial Day;
  • July 4, known as Independence Day;
  • The first Monday in September, known as Labor Day;
  • October 18, known as Alaska Day;
  • November 11, known as Veterans Day;
  • The fourth Thursday in November, known as Thanksgiving Day;
  • December 25, known as Christmas Day;
  • Every Sunday; and
  • Every day designated by public proclamation by the President of the United States or the Governor of Alaska as a legal holiday.

+Alaska Stat. § 44.12.010.

If a holiday falls on a Sunday, that Sunday and the following Monday are both legal holidays. This does not apply to "every Sunday" listed above. +Alaska Stat. § 44.12.020. If a holiday falls on a Saturday, that Saturday and the preceding Friday are both legal holidays. +Alaska Stat. § 44.12.025.

Work Rules Regarding Attendance, Tardiness and Timekeeping

Employers should be aware of the various laws that limit the ability to discipline employees for absenteeism.

Leave as an Accommodation

The Alaska Human Relations Law (AHRL) prohibits discrimination based on religion and physical or mental disability. +Alaska Stat. § 18.80.220. While the law does not specifically call for reasonable accommodations, employers must ensure that decisions regarding employees' leave requests related to a religious belief or practice or to a disability do not violate the AHRL.

Jury Duty Leave

An employer may not deprive an employee of employment or threaten, coerce or penalize an employee because the employee:

  • Receives or responds to a summons for jury service;
  • Serves as a juror; or
  • Attends court for prospective jury service.

It is at the employer's discretion whether time spent on jury service or in court for prospective jury service will be paid. +Alaska Stat. § 09.20.037(a).

Officers or employees of the state called to serve as a juror or subpoenaed as a witness are entitled to administrative leave with pay. Compensation received by the employee or to which the employee is entitled, whichever is greater, for service as a juror or witness can be deducted from the employee's pay. +Alaska Stat. § 39.20.270.

Voting Leave

An employer may not refuse to allow an employee time off for the purpose of voting, or if, after allowing the time off, deduct the time from the employee's wages. However, an employee who has two consecutive hours in which to vote, either between the opening of the polls and the beginning of the employee's regular working shift, or between the end of that regular working shift and the close of the polls, is considered to have sufficient time outside of working hours within which to vote. +Alaska Stat. § 15.56.100.

Military Leave

Under the Military Code of Alaska, an employer must provide a leave of absence to:

  • Members of the organized militia (i.e., the Alaska National Guard, the Alaska Naval Militia and the Alaska State Defense Force) to perform active state service; and
  • Alaska residents who are members of the National Guard of another state to perform active National Guard service under a law of that state.

In addition, an employer must reinstate an employee to his or her former position, or a comparable position, at the pay, seniority and benefit level the employee would have had if he or she had not been absent as a result of that active service.

+Alaska Stat. § 26.05.075. An Alaska employer should consider referring to this law in its employee handbook to educate employees about the availability of leave for certain military duty and to demonstrate their compliance with Alaska's military leave law. For more information on this topic, please see USERRA: Alaska.

Leave for Crime Victims

Employers may not penalize or threaten to penalize a crime victim because the victim is subpoenaed or requested by the prosecuting attorney to attend a court proceeding for the purpose of giving testimony. +Alaska Stat. § 12.61.017.

Health and Family Leave

Employees of covered employers (the state and any political subdivision of the state that employs at least 21 employees in the state for each working day during any period of 20 consecutive workweeks in the two calendar years preceding the leave request) who have been employed for at least 35 hours per week for at least six months or for at least 171/2 hours per week for at least the 12 months preceding the leave are eligible for health and family leave.

Health and family leave may be taken for the following reasons and amounts of time:

  • A serious health condition of the employee or the employee's child, spouse or parent, for a total of 18 workweeks during any 24-month period; and
  • Pregnancy and childbirth or adoption, for a total of 18 workweeks within a 12-month period.

+Alaska Stat. §§ 39.20.305 et seq.

Organ or Bone Marrow Donation Leave

State employees are entitled to a minimum of 40 and a maximum of 80 hours of paid administrative leave to make a personal organ or bone marrow donation, which can include time spent on a screening process to determine whether the employee is a compatible donor. +Alaska Stat. § 39.20.275.

Teacher or School Personnel Leave

A teacher may be granted a leave of absence without pay if:

  • The teacher's application is approved by the governing body of the district; and
  • The teacher agrees to return to employment in a public school not later than the beginning of the school year following termination of the period for which the leave of absence was granted.

A leave of absence is not considered an interruption of the teacher's continuous service necessary to attain or retain retirement or tenure rights. However, the time spent on a leave of absence may not be counted in determining when a teacher has sufficient service to enable the teacher to acquire retirement or tenure rights.

The governing body of the district may:

  • Agree to continue the teacher's retirement contributions if the teacher agrees to pay a certain required percent of the salary he or she would have received during the leave of absence and then reimburse the district for the district's required retirement contribution.
  • Agree to advance the teacher on the district salary schedule when the teacher returns to employment if the governing body determines that the teacher's leave of absence was educationally or professionally beneficial to the teacher or the district.

+Alaska Stat. § 14.20.345.

Work Rules Concerning Employee Misconduct

Employers are free to define misconduct in their employee handbooks as they see fit. However, employers must understand that their definition of misconduct that can result in termination may not match the state's definition for unemployment compensation purposes. Under state law, employees may be disqualified from receiving unemployment benefits if they were terminated for misconduct connected with the employee's work, which includes:

  1. On-the-job conduct that shows willful and wanton disregard of the employer's interest, e.g., gross or repeated negligence, willful violation of reasonable work rules or deliberate violation or disregard of standards of behavior that the employer has the right to expect of an employee; or
  2. Off-the-job conduct that shows a willful and wanton disregard of the employer's interest and either has a direct and adverse impact on the employer's interest or makes the employee unfit to perform an essential task of the job.

Misconduct for unemployment purposes does not include:

  • Inefficiency;
  • Unsatisfactory performance as the result of inability or incapacity;
  • Inadvertence;
  • Ordinary negligence in isolated instances; or
  • Good-faith errors in judgment or discretion.

+Alaska Stat. § 23.20.379(a)(2); +8 Alaska Admin. Code 85.095(d).

Work Rules Regarding Discrimination

The Alaska Human Rights Act (AHRA) prohibits an employer from discriminating against an employee or applicant based on religion, color, or national origin, or because of that individual's age, physical or mental disability, sex, marital status, changes in marital status, pregnancy, or parenthood when the reasonable demands of the position do not require distinction based on the basis of age, physical or mental disability, sex, marital status, changes in marital status, pregnancy, or parenthood. +Alaska Stat. § 18.80.220.

Future Developments

There are no other developments to report at this time. Continue to check XpertHR regularly for the latest information on this and other topics.

Additional Resources

Employee Management > Employee Handbooks - Work Rules - Employee Conduct