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Other Leaves: Colorado

Other Leaves requirements for other states

Federal law and guidance on this subject should be reviewed together with this section.

Authors: Stuart R. Buttrick, Thomas W. Carroll, Susan W. Kline and Mary L. Will, Faegre Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP

Summary

  • There are various types of leave that may be available to an employee in Colorado. See Leaves of Absence.
  • Colorado does not have a state family and medical leave law applicable to private employers. See Family and Medical Leave.
  • An employer that chooses to provide a paid leave of absence for organ donation is eligible for an income tax credit. See Organ Donor Leave.
  • An employer may not terminate or discipline an employee who responds to a subpoena to testify in a criminal proceeding or to participate in the preparation of a criminal proceeding. See Crime Victim Leave.
  • A covered employer must provide victims of domestic abuse, stalking or sexual assault with leave to seek legal assistance or medical care, to secure their homes or to seek a protective order. See Domestic Violence Leave.
  • An employer may not terminate an employee, deprive an employee of any job benefits, or harass, threaten or coerce an employee because the employee receives a jury summons. See Jury Duty Leave.
  • An employer must give an unpaid leave to members of the National Guard or US military reserve for training with the US military. See Military Leave.
  • Qualified volunteers who are called into service for a disaster and volunteer firefighters responding to an emergency summons are entitled to take leave from work under certain circumstances. See Emergency Responder Leave.
  • Depending on an employee's working hours, an employer must allow an employee eligible to vote to be absent from work for two hours, with pay, in order to vote. See Voting Leave.