Practical step-by-step advice on how to manage both common and more unusual workplace situations.

This tool:

  • Provides "how-to" guidance for circumstances that may be confronted by HR in the workplace, such as managing employees with mental disabilities under the ADA or withdrawing an offer of employment.
  • Sets forth a step-by-step process to ensure compliance both with legal requirements and HR best practice.

New and Updated

  • How to Manage Wearable Devices at Work

    This How To details the steps a prudent employer should take to manage wearable technology devices in the workplace.

  • How to Conduct an Internal Investigation

    When employers need to investigate claims of harassment, discrimination or other workplace misconduct, the process of conducting an effective internal investigation can be challenging. This step-by-step recitation of the important issues and pitfalls of internal investigations will guide employers through the process, removing the guesswork.

  • How to Discipline a Union Member

    This How To details the steps a prudent employer should take to discipline a union member.

  • How to Administer the FMLA to Be Consistent With Other Employer-Provided Leaves

    The federal Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) generally serves as a baseline for covered employers when implementing leave policies. When the provisions of an employer's leave policy intersect with the FMLA, the employer should be careful when handling leaves of absence and should administer both the FMLA and the employer's leave policies equitably and in compliance with the law.

  • How to Handle a Request for FMLA Leave

    When an employee requests leave for health, medical, parenting, or military reasons, the employer must determine whether the leave qualifies for FMLA leave. If the time off requested qualifies for FMLA leave, the employer is required to provide the employee with specific notice and information regarding the employee's eligibility, rights and responsibilities under the FMLA.

  • How to Deal With Extra Pay Periods Caused by the Calendar

    A calendar year and an employer's pay periods do not always coincide precisely. Approximately every 11 years, an employer that pays employees on a biweekly basis will have an extra pay period. An employer that pays employees on a weekly basis will have an extra pay period every five or six years. This How To explains an employer's options for properly handling extra pay periods caused by the calendar.

  • How to Determine if an Employee Qualifies for the Executive Exemption

    This How To details the steps a prudent employer should take to determine whether an employee qualifies for the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) executive exemption.

  • How to Determine if an Employee Qualifies for the Administrative Exemption

    This How To details the steps a prudent employer should take to determine whether an employee qualifies for the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) administrative exemption.

  • How to Determine if an Employee Qualifies for the Learned Professional Exemption

    This How To details the steps a prudent employer should take to determine whether an employee qualifies for the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) learned professional exemption.

  • How to Determine if an Employee Qualifies for the Creative Professional Exemption

    This How To details the steps a prudent employer should take to determine whether an employee qualifies for the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) creative professional exemption.

You said it...

XpertHR is a go-to resource for my company for guidance on HR compliance. Prior to choosing XpertHR, we looked into a few other resources, but in the end it came down to the ease of use and quality of the data, as well as the breadth of information on the site.

Sarah Anderson, HR Manager, Smokey Bones Bar & Fire Grill