Employee Management - HR Policies Guidance

Editor's Note: Keep your policies current with state and federal laws!

Beth P. ZollerOverview: Effectively managing employees requires many things from HR. Employee management has many areas of concern. First and foremost, it is critical to draft and implement employee handbooks as well as workplace rules and policies. This sets ground rules for employee conduct and behavior and ensures consistency and uniformity when faced with common workplace issues. With employers under constant scrutiny, it is important to maintain and enforce policies against employee discrimination and harassment and guarantee compliance with equal employment opportunity laws. Employers should also make sure that they know how to properly respond to employee request for leave and time off from work as well as evaluate employee performance and determine advancement and promotion opportunities.

Other challenges employers may be faced with when managing a workforce include monitoring employee activity while protecting the employee right to privacy, providing training to supervisors and employees at all levels, and communicating with employees regarding workplace issues, employer expectations and discipline.

Trends: Federal, state and municipal laws are expanding equal employment opportunity laws to caregivers, pregnant women, transgender workers and others. There is also a growing movement among the states to pass legislation aimed at combating workplace bullying and ensure a healthy workplace.

Further, with an increase in employee use of the internet and social media, there are two issues employers should be keenly aware of. There is a move for legislation to prevent employers from requiring that employees and applicants provide their user names and passwords to social media networks. Second, the NLRB has shown that it is willing to strike down common workplace policies regarding social media, employee communications, investigations and confidentiality claiming such policies interfere with the right of union and non-union employees to engage in protected concerted activity.

Author: Beth Zoller, JD, Legal Editor

Latest items in Employee Management

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    Date:
    22 October 2014
    Type:
    Editor's Choice

    The Minimum Wage, FMLA, Other Leaves and Employee Communications sections of the Employment Law Manual have been updated after the San Diego City Council repealed its new minimum wage and paid sick leave ordinance.

  • About This State Supplement Handbook Statement: New York

    Type:
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    New York employers seeking to explain how the handbook and supplement should be read together and that neither the handbook nor the supplement alter an employee's at-will status should consider including this model policy statement in their handbook.

  • EEO Handbook Statement: New York

    Type:
    Employee Handbooks

    New York employers with four or more employees should consider including this model policy statement in their handbook.

  • Political Opinions Handbook Statement: New York

    Type:
    Employee Handbooks

    New York employers seeking to inform employees about their policy against voter intimidation and to demonstrate compliance with New York's election law should consider including this model policy statement in their handbook.

  • Pregnancy Accommodation Handbook Statement: New York City, New York

    Type:
    Employee Handbooks

    New York employers that have four or more employees, have employees working in New York City and that are seeking to inform employees, including supervisors, that the company will provide reasonable accommodations to New York City employees with needs related to pregnancy, childbirth or a related medical condition should consider including this model policy statement in their handbook.

  • Accommodation for Victims of Domestic Violence Handbook Statement: New York City, New York

    Type:
    Employee Handbooks

    New York employers that have four or more employees, have employees working in New York City and that are seeking to inform employees, including supervisors, that the company will provide reasonable accommodations to victims of domestic violence, sex offenses or stalking should consider including this model policy statement in their handbook .

  • Meal Breaks Handbook Statement: New York

    Type:
    Employee Handbooks

    New York employers seeking to inform employees and their supervisors about legally-required meal breaks and to demonstrate compliance with the law should consider including this model policy statement in their handbook.

  • Lactation Accommodation Handbook Statement: New York

    Type:
    Employee Handbooks

    New York employers that do not have a lactation accommodation policy and are seeking to show their compliance and support for New York law which requires that employers provide unpaid break time and reasonable locations for employees to express breast milk should consider including this model policy statement in their handbook.

  • Jury Duty Leave Handbook Statement [1-9 employees]: New York

    Type:
    Employee Handbooks

    New York employers with fewer than 10 employees that are seeking to educate employees about the availability of jury and witness duty leave and to demonstrate compliance with New York's jury duty leave law should consider including this model policy statement in their handbook .

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    Type:
    Employee Handbooks

    New York employers with 10 or more employees that are seeking to educate employees about the availability of jury duty leave and to demonstrate compliance with New York's jury duty leave law should consider including this model policy statement in their handbook.

About this topic

Legal considerations for employers regarding managing employees through HR. Employee management tips and support for the human resources professional.