HR Support on OSHA Regulations

Editor's Note: Create a safe and healthy place of employment.

Ashley ShawOverview: The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is the division of the Department of Labor in charge of creating and enforcing workplace safety and health. With limited exceptions, OSHA regulates almost all private industry workers in states that do not have their own, OSHA-approved state plan.

OSHA creates regulations for several specific industries, as well as general regulations for all industries; it conducts inspections of workplaces to make sure employers are complying with applicable standards; and it issues citations for violations. To make compliance easier, OSHA also offers many compliance programs to help employers create safer workplaces and to encourage and recognize the workplaces that go above and beyond, as well as to put extra pressure on those workplaces that consistently fail to follow the regulations.

Along with the health and safety regulations, OSHA also has several recordkeeping and posting requirements that almost all regulated employers must follow. Most employers that fall under OSHA must fill out the OSHA logs every year, as well as post a total injury and illness record in a conspicuous place every year from February 1 to April 30. At all times, employers must have the OSHA Job Safety and Health: It's the Law poster hanging in the workplace.

Trends: OSHA recently updated its Hazard Communication Standard to better conform to the Globally Harmonized System. With a series of rolling deadlines, employers need to update their written programs, training requirements, safety data sheets and labels and warnings.

Author: Ashley Shaw, JD, Legal Editor

Latest items in Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)

  • Employee Discipline: Arizona

    Type:
    Employment Law Manual

    In-depth review of the spectrum of Arizona employment law requirements HR must follow with respect to employee discipline.

  • How to Promote Integrity in the Workplace and Protect Whistleblowers

    Type:
    How To

    Whistleblowing is the act of informing an employer, government agency or other authority about fraud, misconduct or other illegal acts occurring in an organization. With proper procedures in place, an employer can create an environment of integrity that allows employees' concerns to be addressed, well in advance of employees reporting their concerns to an external entity. To promote integrity in the workplace and avoid the need for external whistleblowing, employers should take the steps in this How To.

  • Supreme Court: SOX Whistleblower Provisions Protect Contractor, Subcontractor Employees

    Date:
    04 March 2014
    Type:
    News

    The Supreme Court has ruled that employees of private companies that contract with public companies are covered by the whistleblower protections found in the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (SOX). The Court's ruling in Lawson v. FMR, LLC preserves the relatively broad interpretation of SOX's whistleblower provisions favored by the US Department of Labor (DOL).

  • OSHA Issues 2014 Inspection Plan

    Date:
    03 March 2014
    Type:
    News

    OSHA released its 2014 inspection plan, which focuses its inspection resources on non-construction, high-hazard industries. An employer with 20 or more workers in one of these industries could be randomly selected for a programmed inspection.

  • DOL Initiates Suit Against Ohio Bell for Reputed OSHA Violations

    Date:
    24 February 2014
    Type:
    News

    The DOL initiated suit against the Ohio Bell Telephone Company after 13 workers were suspended shortly after reporting workplace injuries.

  • Employee Discipline: District of Columbia

    Type:
    Employment Law Manual

    In-depth review of the spectrum of District of Columbia employment law requirements HR must follow with respect Employee Discipline

  • OSHA Injury and Illness Summary Form

    Date:
    04 February 2014
    Type:
    Editor's Choice

    OSHA 's Injury and Illness Summary Form must be posted from February 1 until April 30 of every year. It is important for employers to handle this requirement correctly so as not to be cited by OSHA. This hot topic showcases XpertHR's various Tools and resources that explain how to follow this requirement.

  • OSHA Injury, Illness Summary Must Be Posted by February 1

    Date:
    30 January 2014
    Type:
    News

    The OSHA Form 300a "Summary of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses" must be posted by most employers from February 1 until April 30 of every year.

  • Nevada Emergency Phone Numbers Poster

    Type:
    Policies and Documents

    As mandated by the Nevada Department of Business and Industry, Division of Industrial Relations, every Nevada employer covered by the Nevada Occupational Safety and Health Act must post the Nevada Emergency Phone Numbers Poster.

  • Nevada Safety and Health Protection on the Job Poster

    Type:
    Policies and Documents

    As mandated by the Nevada Department of Business and Industry, Division of Industrial Relations, every Nevada employer covered by the Nevada Occupational Safety and Health Act must post the Nevada Safety and Health Protection on the Job Poster.