HR Policies and Procedures

Editor's Note: Develop comprehensive policies and procedures to manage effectively.

Beth P. ZollerOverview: It is important for employers to develop and institute a comprehensive set of HR policies and procedures to guide the conduct of both employees and supervisors in the workplace and protect both employers and employees. Standard policies and procedures also ensure that similar situations are dealt with in a consistent manner and the employer's business runs efficiently. The workplace policies and procedures should be memorialized and may be provided in the employee handbook or other document given to employees and/or supervisors.

An employer may want to develop different HR policies and procedures for different groups of employees depending on the department that they work in, whether or not the employee is part of a union, and whether or not the employee is an exempt or non-exempt employee. Workplace policies and procedures may cover such varied topics as discrimination and harassment, social media use, employee benefits, compensation, employee discipline, affirmative action, FMLA and employee leave. While workplace rules provide employees with standards of conduct that must be followed, policies and procedures are usually more formal and provide supervisors and management with a standard manner of handling frequent situations. Workplace policies and procedures should also carefully lay out the consequences and discipline that employees and supervisors may be subject to for violating a workplace policy.

Trends: Employers should be aware that changes in society, technology and the law may require employers to revise existing policies and create new ones. We live in a society in which our technology and the way we connect with others in changing rapidly. As a result, employers must constantly revisit their policies with respect to electronic communications and social media use. Employment policies on employee benefits and compensation also may need to be frequently updated based on changes in the law. Further, based on the fact that the amendments to the Americans with Disabilities Act significantly expanded the definition of an individual with a qualified disability, workplace policies regarding managing employees with disabilities should also be reviewed and revised on a frequently basis.

Author: Beth P. Zoller, JD, Legal Editor

Latest items in Policies and Procedures

  • New Jersey-Specific Employee Handbook Policies Now Live

    Date:
    25 March 2015
    Type:
    Editor's Choice

    The New Jersey employee handbook policy statements and associated "when to include" and "employer guidance" for each policy are now live and have been added to the new Employee Handbooks Tool.

  • About This State Supplement Handbook Statement: New Jersey

    Type:
    Employee Handbooks

    New Jersey employers seeking to explain how the handbook and supplement should be read together and that neither the handbook nor the supplement alter an employee's at-will status should consider including this model policy statement in their handbook.

  • EEO Handbook Statement: New Jersey

    Type:
    Employee Handbooks

    New Jersey employers should consider including this model policy statement in their handbook.

  • Political Opinions Handbook Statement: New Jersey

    Type:
    Employee Handbooks

    New Jersey employers seeking to inform employees about their policy against voter intimidation and to demonstrate compliance with New Jersey law should consider including this model policy statement in their handbook.

  • Pregnancy Accommodation Handbook Statement: New Jersey

    Type:
    Employee Handbooks

    New Jersey employers seeking to inform employees, including supervisors, that employees may be entitled to a reasonable accommodation for known limitations relating to pregnancy, childbirth or related medical conditions, including recovery from childbirth should consider including this model policy statement in their handbook.

  • Whistleblower Protections (Conscientious Employee Protection Act) Handbook Statement: New Jersey

    Type:
    Employee Handbooks

    New Jersey employers seeking to inform employees of their rights under the New Jersey Conscientious Employee Protection Act (CEPA) and to provide detailed information regarding reporting procedures should consider including this model policy statement in their handbook.

  • Meal Breaks for Minors Handbook Statement: New Jersey

    Type:
    Employee Handbooks

    New Jersey employers that employ minor employees (those under age 18) and seek to inform the minor employees and their supervisors about legally required meal breaks and to demonstrate compliance with New Jersey law should consider including this model policy statement in their handbook.

  • Family Leave Handbook Statement: New Jersey

    Type:
    Employee Handbooks

    New Jersey employers that employ 50 or more employees, including employees outside of New Jersey, for each working day during each of 20 or more workweeks in the current or preceding calendar year should consider including this model policy statement in their handbook.

  • Paid Sick Time Handbook Statement [10+ Employees]: Jersey City, New Jersey

    Type:
    Employee Handbooks

    Jersey City employers with 10 or more employees seeking to educate employees about the availability of paid sick time and to show their compliance with Jersey City's Earned Sick Time Ordinance (ESTO) should consider including this model policy statement in their handbook.

  • Sick Time Handbook Statement [1-9 Employees]: Jersey City, New Jersey

    Type:
    Employee Handbooks

    Jersey City employers with 1-9 employees seeking to educate employees about the availability of unpaid sick time and to show their compliance with Jersey City's Earned Sick Time Ordinance (ESTO) should consider including this model policy statement in their handbook.

About this topic

Guidance on creating and implementing HR policies that provide employees and supervisors standards and procedures with which they should comply.