Topics

Administrative Exemption

New and Updated

  • Type:
    Employment Law Manual

    Employee Classification: Rhode Island

    In-depth review of the spectrum of Rhode Island employment law requirements HR must follow with respect to employee classification.

  • Type:
    Employment Law Manual

    Employee Classification: Delaware

    In-depth review of the spectrum of Delaware employment law requirements HR must follow with respect to employee classification.

  • Type:
    Employment Law Manual

    Employee Classification: Hawaii

    In-depth review of the spectrum of Hawaii employment law requirements HR must follow with respect to employee classification.

  • Type:
    Employment Law Manual

    Employee Classification: North Dakota

    In-depth review of the spectrum of North Dakota employment law requirements HR must follow with respect to employee classification.

  • Type:
    Employment Law Manual

    Employee Classification: Minnesota

    In-depth review of the spectrum of Minnesota employment law requirements HR must follow with respect to Employee Classification.

  • Type:
    Employment Law Manual

    Employee Classification: Kansas

    In-depth review of the spectrum of Kansas employment law requirements HR must follow with respect to employee classification.

  • Type:
    Employment Law Manual

    Employee Classification: New Jersey

    In-depth review of the spectrum of New Jersey employment law requirements HR must follow with respect to employee classification.

  • Type:
    Employment Law Manual

    Employee Classification: Wyoming

    In-depth review of the spectrum of Wyoming employment law requirements HR must follow with respect to exempt and nonexempt employee classification.

  • Type:
    FAQs

    How can an employer figure out what an employee's primary duty is?

  • Type:
    Policies and Documents

    FLSA Employee Classification Form

    An employer may use this form to keep track of an employee's classification under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). In the event of a lawsuit alleging a misclassification, the burden of proof is on the employer to demonstrate that an employee qualifies for exemption.